crystals, Environment

Choosing Crystals Consciously

So, I’ve made no secret of the fact that stones occupy a place of honor in my practice. When I first started learning, I was drawn to the magic of gemstones above anything else. I think I got it from my dad — he made jewelry, beautiful things of silver, bone, and stone. From a young age, I was surrounded by bright lapis lazuli, soothing rose quartz, and shimmering tiger’s eye.

I like gemstones because they resonate with me. I’ve learned how to choose stones that make me feel uplifted and energetic, pieces that are as functional as they are beautiful.

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But not everything crystal-related is all sweetness and light.

Diamonds are notorious for their controversy — pulled out of the earth in places stricken by war, sold to finance warlords and dictators. Unfortunately, they aren’t the only stones that are sometimes paid for in blood.

Most witches and other magic practitioners know that, when you get a new tool — or bring anything into your home, really — it’s a good idea to cleanse it to remove the energy of everyone and everything it’s come in contact with before you. What cleansing is good enough to ease the pain of a nine year old child laborer?
(And all of that’s before you even consider the environmental impact of gemstones.)

The picture isn’t entirely bleak, though. For those who aren’t willing or able to give up gemstones entirely, there’s one easy way to fight back: Know where your crystals come from, and choose wisely.

When I collect a stone or make a wand, I make an effort to find out as much as I can about where the components came from and how they were gathered. I’m not at all against hunting (it beats factory farming), but I use naturally-shed antlers. I know the areas the crystals came from, and try to source as much as I can from mines within the U.S., since it makes transparency a little easier.

There’s only one problem — this really isn’t as easy as it sounds. Most metaphysical shops and gemstone suppliers don’t provide information on their stones’ origins, if they were ever even given it in the first place. The places that do may also charge a premium, because cheap stones come at the expense of things like environmental protections and worker safety. So, if you can find ethical sources of gemstones, support them! Money talks, and the best way individuals have to end the trade in unethical crystals is to create an economic disincentive. It’s a slow, imperfect process, but it’s what we’ve got right now.

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Estate sales are another option for those who don’t want to directly contribute to the trade in unethical stones. While they may have been mined under poor conditions, there’s really no undoing that. Keeping estate sale stones in circulation is a way to help reduce our dependence on mining.

Using local stones is another option. Crystals are pretty, and their properties are helpful, but quartz is incredibly abundant. Some of my favorite stones to work with are simple river rocks I picked up on a vacation with my boyfriend, or holey stones found in a creek.

Mining is dangerous and labor-intensive for workers at the best of times, and stones are sensitive things. While crystals may be longer-lived and more durable than animals or plants, they are no less affected by their environment, and these effects are passed on. Take the time to know where your stones come from, appreciate the tremendous amount of energy, effort, and danger involved in mining them, and contribute to reducing the burden on the people and places that bring them to you.

 

 

art, crystals

5 Crystals for Creativity

Note: This post contains affiliate links to some of the stones I talk about. They allow me to earn a small finder’s fee, at no additional cost to you. Thank you for helping to support independent artists and artisans, as well as this site!

Creative blocks. We get ’em, we hate ’em. The feeling of grasping for an idea is never fun — words and images seem just out of reach, and we know that if we could just get something down, we’d be able to take it from there.

If you deal with the occasional block, or just want some help channeling your creative impulses, try keeping some of these stones in your work space:

Sodalite

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Blue sodalite beads.

Sodalite is said to promote logic and rationality, but it has a ton of other properties that make it a useful tool in the artist’s arsenal. It’s ability to help balance emotions and soothe panicky feelings can help combat those times when a blank page feels too intimidating. Use it when you need to calm anxiety and trust yourself to create beautiful things.

Check out some beautiful, large sodalite specimens at RockParadise.

Golden Rutilated Quartz

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Golden rutilated quartz is clear quartz filled with golden “hairs” of rutile. It’s an uplifting stone, and is said to help clear energetic blockages. As a form of clear quartz, it can be programmed with your intentions, while the golden rutile needles within it help to stimulate creativity and invite divine inspiration.

Check out some very pretty pieces of tumbled golden rutilated quartz, also at RockParadise.

Lodolite

Lodolite it my favorite stone, bar none. It, like golden rutilated quartz, is another form of quartz with inclusions of other minerals. However, while rutilated quartz contains characteristic needles of rutile, lodolite can contain any number of different minerals, often in patterns that resemble miniature landscapes. (Hence three of its other names — garden, landscape, or scenic quartz.)

Lodolite is a great stone for enhancing communication, and is especially helpful if a trance or trancelike state is part of your creative process. It’s powers of manifestation can combine here to help you achieve a creative trance, communicate the ideas that come to you, and manifest the creative works in your heart.

Check out some really stunning lodolite teardrops at MagiMinerals.

Citrine

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A citrine cluster made of heat-treated amethyst.

Is any stone happier or more effervescent than citrine? I’ve never met one I didn’t like. Using citrine can help connect you to a very joyful energy. It also helps promote the easy flow of ideas, ideal for creative brainstorming sessions, and enhances clarity and visualization. It’s a very bright, energetic stone. Any form of citrine will do, but those that haven’t had their color artificially enhanced seem to work the best.

Check out some polished, natural citrine points at RockParadise.

Herkimer Diamonds

Fortunately for us, Herkimer diamonds are not diamonds — they’re actually a type of double-terminated quartz. While double-terminated quartz can be found anywhere, though, these are specifically from around Herkimer, New York.

These stones are potent. Like golden rutilated quartz, they help remove blockages to promote the free flow of energy. It’s considered a powerful stone for workplaces, attracting positive attention (and, with it, money). It’s also said to “boost” other stones, helping small stones to act like much larger ones. Most Herkimer diamonds are small, but they don’t need to be big to pack a wallop.

Check out some lovely Herkimer diamonds at BlissCrystals.
Creativity can be a fickle thing, but not all of us can work on its timetable. (Personally, I can’t tell you how many times I’ve been handed an order from a client on a day when the words just. Were. Not. Flowing.) With some discipline and a little help unblocking our energies and getting the creative juices flowing again, we can overcome blocks and keep the ideas coming.

 

 

crystals, Witchcraft

5 Ways to Cleanse “Difficult” Crystals

So, the bog-standard crystal cleanse is pretty simple: immerse it in salt water, hold it under running water, cover it in dry salt, or stick it in the sun. Easy, right?

There’s only one problem: those are very efficient ways to accidentally destroy a lot of different minerals. Your stones might come out energetically cleansed, but they also might be much worse for wear. (Cleansing selenite, for example, definitely shouldn’t involve water.)

It’s important to remember that, beneath that shiny surface, there’s a ton going on in a crystal in a molecular sense. Some crystals’ color and structure depends on water molecules bound up in their matrix, like opals. Some contain soluble material, like selenite. Some might leach toxic compounds into water when soaked, like pyrite. Some might just end up fading on you — especially translucent crystals, like amethyst or rose quartz.

So, how do you cleanse crystals that won’t survive regular cleansing methods?

Continue reading “5 Ways to Cleanse “Difficult” Crystals”